What happens when a reader gets riled up about female coaches?

A few days ago, I wrote a piece for our Insight section about why women are shut out of head coaching positions in men’s sports — even as men are routinely hired to coach women’s sports.

“The dusty arguments hurried out against promoting women to marquee coaching positions — that they lack the requisite experience, or the bearing or psychology, or the backbone to handle a male environment — amount to the same kind of hokum once used to keep women out of the boardroom.”

San Antonio Spurs coach Becky Hammon celebrates with her team after they defeated the Phoenix Suns in an NBA summer league championship basketball game Monday, July 20, 2015, in Las Vegas. Hammon is the first full-time female assistant coach in any of the four major professional sports leagues. (AP Photo/John Locher)

San Antonio Spurs coach Becky Hammon celebrates with her team after they defeated the Phoenix Suns in an NBA summer league championship basketball game Monday, July 20, 2015, in Las Vegas. Hammon is the first full-time female assistant coach in any of the four major professional sports leagues. (AP Photo/John Locher)

(The essay was a follow-up in a way, to a book I wrote last year that got at cultural expectations involving sports, race and gender in America — the book, called “Year of the Dunk: A Modest Defiance of Gravity,” tracked my own, sometimes-comic efforts as a middle-aged white dude trying to dunk.)

Apparently not all readers were sympathetic to the piece. Evidently confused about my gender, one reader who wrote me about it wasn’t so keen on my trying to ask him a few questions. (You might want to read from the bottom up.)

women coaching

Read the full essay at MyStatesman.com.